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"Water is the driving force of all nature"  -Leonardo da Vinci

Ask any Platypus. They’ll tell you that staying hydrated can mean the difference between an average day and an unforgettable day. That’s why we included the original collapsible, taste- and BPA-free hydration system in your April Cache Crate—for people living life to its fullest.

Nothing’s cleaner, greener*, or more versatile than a Platypus SoftBottle flexible bottle. Whether you’re out geocaching, working, running, catching a flight, or hitting the gym after work, the SoftBottle flexible bottle is your source for easy hydration.

Your body depends on water to survive. Every cell, tissue, and organ in your body needs water to work correctly. For example, your body uses water to maintain its temperature, remove waste, and lubricate joints. Water is needed for good health.

Symptoms of dehydration include the following:

  • Little or no urine, or urine that is darker than usual
  • Dry mouth
  • Sleepiness or fatigue
  • Extreme thirst
  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness or lightheaded feeling
  • No tears when crying

Don’t wait until you notice symptoms of dehydration to take action. Actively prevent dehydration by drinking plenty of water.

Tips for staying hydrated

  • Keep a bottle of water with you during the day. Purchasing bottled water is expensive and creates plastic bottle waste. Carry a reusable water bottle and fill it from the tap instead.
  • If you don’t like the taste of plain water, try adding a slice of lemon or lime to your drink.
  • Be sure to drink water before, during, and after a workout.
  • When you’re feeling hungry, drink water. Thirst is often confused with hunger. True hunger will not be satisfied by drinking water. Drinking water may also contribute to a healthy weight-loss plan. Some research suggests that drinking water can help you feel full.
  • If you have trouble remembering to drink water, drink on a schedule. For example, drink water when you wake up; at breakfast, lunch, and dinner; and when you go to bed. Or drink a small glass of water at the beginning of each hour.
  • Drink water when you go to a restaurant. It will keep you hydrated, and it’s free!

Partially adapted from: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/food-nutrition/nutrients/hydration-why-its-so-important.html

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ticks-while-geocaching-question-of-the-dayHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Facebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: Have you ever found a tick on yourself after geocaching?

After tallying all the answers, we found that only 5% of cachers have not found a tick after geocaching!

So here is what we heard:

  • Doug on FB shared: Only while hiking with my family during my sabbatical from geocaching.
  • David on Twitter shared: only one? If you only found one, you weren't looking hard enough.
  • James on FB shared: Both during and after geocaching. And the rest of the day, I will be finding imaginary ticks crawling on me...
  • Ron shared: Yes, and they tick me off!
  • Tom on G+ shared: Yes, a number of times.  While Minnesota may not be the tick capital of the world, it's still a major problem.  Most tick contact in this area is between May and August, but they can show up any time between late March and mid November.
    In 2014, I ended up with a case of Lyme Disease that took about 6 weeks just to diagnose.  I got it from one of the ticks I came into contact with that fall.  My wife, PJayCee, has also been treated for Lyme Disease.

    • Luckily Lyme disease is pretty rare here in the Inland NW. However, one of my local geo-friends was finally diagnosed with Lyme disease after a trip to Pennsylvania.

To be honest, we really didn’t enjoy hearing about ticks, but you can as well, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

 

With winter well under way here in the Northern Hemisphere, we’d like to share some cold weather geocaching tips with you.

Cold Weather Geocaching Tips!

Safety and What to Pack:

The first thing to think about is safety and what to pack. Before heading out, here’s a quick checklist:

  • Be sure to tell someone where you are going: you can leave a note at home, email a friend, update your Facebook or Twitter with your intended caching target or area.
  • Pack extra batteries as the cold will drain the ones you have even faster.
  • Always carry water and food with you. That ’short hike’ (or drive) to the cache may turn out to be a lot longer than you planned. We often don’t drink enough fluids when out in the cold.
  • Don’t forget extra water for your kids & canine caching companions.
  • Check the forecast and watch the weather -it can change fast when you are geocaching! We like Wunderground.
  • Know when the sun will set -it gets dark early in the northern latitudes.
  • Pack a headlamp or flashlight. Better yet, pack two. And check the batteries.

winter-night-caching-group

Finding Caches in Cold Weather:

OK, so you’re all set: gear is packed, GPS is fired up and you’re at the trail head … Now, off to finding caches!

  • Mark your car’s coordinates.
  • Know your limits, and those of your caching companions. That 10 minute hike can take over an hour in some winter conditions. It’s OK to DNF a cache and make it home alright.
  • Do your best to ensure that all seals on the cache are tight and closed properly to avoid moisture from getting in.
  • Be careful not to damage frozen containers as you may find some caches frozen shut. Don’t ruin the cache by hitting it against something hard in an attempt to open it. You could break the seal and ruin the fun for everyone.
  • Don’t bring anything liquid to trade -it can freeze, burst and ruin the cache contents.

winter-hike-with-Eve

Cold Weather Cache Hiding Tips:

So you want to hide a cache in winter? Here are some tips.

  • Keep in mind the changing of the seasons. That snowy white camo might look great in winter, but stick out in the spring and summer.
  • Will the leaves turn and fall later, exposing your cache? Or grow back and mess up your camo?
  • Don’t leave anything liquid in the cache.
  • Use a water tight container.
  • Be sure to leave pencils, not pens, in the cache.
  • How will deep snow affect finding your cache? You might want to hide it above the expected snow level.
  • Use appropriate attributes for your cache. You may even need to change these with the changing of the seasons.

This is by no means an exhaustive list for cold weather caching. What tips do you have to add?

GQotDPinterestHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers onFacebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: Do you carry a first aid kit while geocaching?

After tallying all the answers, we found that 18% of cachers do not carry a first aid kit, and the other 82% either carry one or have one nearby while out caching.

So here is what we heard:

  • Stacywilson00 on Twitter shared: No, but I will be soon for our local 4-H club, it will be a year long project!
  • Fishgirl27 shared: Only when we don't end up needing it. Get injured more going after P&Gs
  • Kari on G+ shared: No, don't think it would be necessary unless I was in deep wilderness. Not much of that where I live.
  • Ry_Too_D2 shared: I cache with two kids. A first-aid kit is a necessity!
  • Chad on FB summed it up for most of us. He shared: It depends. A deep hike in the woods w/ my Geo-backpack is a yes. Short hikes no. Urban caching, I've got a first aid kit in the car.
  • And Scott shared: No. But now you've got me to thinking that I should.
    • Good to hear Scott, and stay safe!

As always we really enjoyed hearing about first aid kits, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!