This month's geochallenge has been issued!  Will you accept the challenge?

To help you with this #geochallenge, we thought we would give you a Trackable 101 to help you accept the challenge:

Trackables 101

What are trackables you ask? They are items that are uniquely identified (special unique code on each one) that are meant to travel from place to place, person to person.

Maybe you’ve heard of those traveling gnomes that people take with them on trips and then take their picture at scenic spots? Or how about Where’s George Dollars that you can track by the serial number to see where this dollar has been spent before?

Trackables are usually found in geocaches -but not always! They move from place to place, picking up stories along the way. You can add your own story, or live vicariously through each trackable’s adventures.

Trackables come in many forms, such as:

Here are some great hints to help you learn more about trackables, and some basic etiquette for handing trackables.

A Travel Bug is a trackable item that moves from place to place, picking up stories along the way. More here: www.geocaching.com/track

Trackables usually have goals. Read the trackable page, recent logs online or in the cache logbook, and look for a goal tag with many trackables. Don’t move it contrary to its goals.

Pick up a trackable? Log it ASAP. If you hold onto it more than 2 weeks, you should email the owner as a courtesy.

You do not have to leave a trackable in order to pick one up.

Don’t wish to pick up a trackable? You can discover it. Tells owner that it is not missing.

Do not log a discover if you haven’t actually seen or handled a trackable.

Don’t grab trackable from other geocacher until it is dropped into a cache or event. You may mess up miles or goals.

Is the trackable missing? Mark it as missing on page. Prevents others from looking for it.

Promo trackables: jeeps, diabetes. Do not collect and hoard; these are meant to be shared.

Many trackables have their own icon that will show on your profile at geocaching.com when you discover or grab them.

Some trackables aren’t in caches; they are on cars, shirts, bikes, etc. These are usually discovered.

Many geocachers buy and keep their own collection of trackables and will share at events to be discovered, or even trade online.

If the trackable goal is known and you cannot fulfill it, place it where someone can, or pass it person to person to fulfill its goals.

Do you have any  more tips to add?  Please do so in the comments!

Geochallenge of the month is about Trackables!

Guest Post by Josh and Liz from Peanuts or Pretzels

It's no secret that Liz and I love spending our days outside exploring the world. From big cities, to National parks, museums loaded with history, to hiking on back trails. In fact, one of the reasons we love Geocaching is that it goes along perfectly with our travels. So it's important to be prepared for your Geocaching adventures at all times, and that includes having the right equipment in your Geocaching bag.

What is geocaching, geocaching, geocaching app, best geocaching app, geocache, geocaches, geocaching for kids, geocaching gps, geocaching supplies, geocaching free, geocaching definition, geocache definition, road trip ideas, road trip games, road trip essentials, road trip tips, road trip planner, planning a road trip

A Good "Geocaching Bag" is Essential

Since we enjoy combining all of these things into our trips, it's essential to have a good geocaching bag that meets our variety of needs. It's important that the bag not be too small, or too big. And for us, it needs to fit everything we need to be prepared for a day hike, or traveling and exploring a new city. Luckily for us, we've found the perfect bag for our geocaching adventures. In fact, we enjoy it so much that we refer to it as our "adventure bag!"

Our "adventure bag" is always stocked and ready to go at a moments notice.

Geocaching 101, Geocaching, What do I need to go Caching?, cache, geocache, Peanuts or Pretzels, trackables, GPS, Garmin
Must Haves in Your Geocaching Bag

Must Have's In Your Geocaching Bag

SmartPhone or a GPS & Spare Batteries

One of the first essential items for your Geocaching Bag is, of course, some kind of GPS unit. You may opt for a handheld unit, or you might be happy with the good ol' smartphone and Geocaching App. We started out using the Smartphone, but realized that it limited us when we wanted to get out into the wilderness. It also because a problem when we traveled abroad, those data roaming fees will get you!

No matter which item you prefer to use, you should always make sure it is fully charged - or that you have spare batteries on hand too!

What is geocaching, geocaching, geocaching app, best geocaching app, geocache, geocaches, geocaching for kids, geocaching gps, geocaching supplies, geocaching free, geocaching definition, geocache definition, road trip ideas, road trip games, road trip essentials, road trip tips, road trip planner, planning a road trip
Hitting the GA Geo-Trail with our Adventure Bag

Sun & Bug Sprays

Being an outdoor activity, you should always carry some kind of protective sprays. Whether it is for the sun or for bugs, you never know when you might need it. And it could make for a miserable experience (maybe more miserable AFTERWARDS) if you don't have it on hand. But it's not just the wilderness, you will also need these even if you are in the city! I can't tell you how many times we've gotten caught up while wandering around town, sightseeing and Geocaching. Only later did we realize that our faces were super sunburned!

Luckily, most stores sell small travel versions of bug spray and sunscreen. So it's easy to pop a couple of them into your Geocaching bag, that way you will always have them.

What is geocaching, geocaching, geocaching app, best geocaching app, geocache, geocaches, geocaching for kids, geocaching gps, geocaching supplies, geocaching free, geocaching definition, geocache definition, road trip ideas, road trip games, road trip essentials, road trip tips, road trip planner, planning a road trip
Navigating the halls of Angkor Wat in Cambodia

Don't Forget the Water!

It is critical to stay good and hydrated anytime you are outdoors, but it's especially important when you are out geocaching. As travelers, we make it a habit to bring a bottle of water wherever we go -- from sightseeing around town, to boat rides, beach trips, or a hike. It's a good habit to have.

And when you are geocaching in the wilderness, it's even more important to have water with you. So be sure to look for a Geocaching Bag that has space for you to carry a water bottle. Don't forget it!

What is geocaching, geocaching, geocaching app, best geocaching app, geocache, geocaches, geocaching for kids, geocaching gps, geocaching supplies, geocaching free, geocaching definition, geocache definition, road trip ideas, road trip games, road trip essentials, road trip tips, road trip planner, planning a road trip
You never know what you might run across while out Geocaching - Grand Cayman Island

Bring a Notebook and ALWAYS Have Extra Pens!

All cachers can relate to the "pen problem" at some point or another. So we make it a point to put many pens in our Geocaching bag, you don't want to be caught without...or without one that works! Also, you should consider bringing a small notebook too. Sometimes you need to take notes for multi-caches, or have another situation where you need to write something down or make calculations. So the notebook will definitely come in handy.

What is geocaching, geocaching, geocaching app, best geocaching app, geocache, geocaches, geocaching for kids, geocaching gps, geocaching supplies, geocaching free, geocaching definition, geocache definition, road trip ideas, road trip games, road trip essentials, road trip tips, road trip planner, planning a road trip
Located the Geocache!

Nice-to-Haves in Your Geocaching Bag

For us, there are some other "nice-to-haves" that we include in our Geocaching Bag too. These aren't critical items, and some people might not are to bring them along. But for us, these items seem to be quite useful or enhance the experience. For example, we like to bring a small flashlight in case it gets dark or if we are looking inside a dark place. We also prefer to bring a small first aid kit as well as some snacks to munch on. We also like to bring an iPod and mini-boombox, which we turn on at a low volume when we are hiking. The sound helps to warn off wildlife, and makes for a peaceful walk in the woods for the two of us.

Lastly, we have a bag of trackables that always stays in the Geocaching Bag as well as some swag items - just in case we stumble across something we want to trade for inside a cache. If you take something out, you have to put something in. Always be good to your fellow Cachers.

Oh, and we also like to bring the camera along. You never know when you will come across an amazing site!

 

 

What is geocaching, geocaching, geocaching app, best geocaching app, geocache, geocaches, geocaching for kids, geocaching gps, geocaching supplies, geocaching free, geocaching definition, geocache definition, road trip ideas, road trip games, road trip essentials, road trip tips, road trip planner, planning a road trip
Turning back after finding the geocache to enjoy the beautiful view of the Petronas Towers! -- Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Tell Us What's in Your Geocaching Bag!

While this is our list of "must haves," we know that everyone has their own unique list from their experiences. So please, tell us what is in your Geocaching bag in the comments below. Cheers and happy caching!

 

cache advance geocaching bloggers, peanuts or pretzels, travel caching, adventure caching
Josh and Liz
Caching Name: Peanuts or Pretzels

We're Josh & Liz, expert travelers who love a good Geocaching adventure. Visit our website Peanuts or Pretzels to find out how we can help make your trip planning easier and more fun...as well as incorporating Geocaching into your next vacation!

Discover the Fun Now!

Join the adventure and follow us on Social Media!

facebooktwitteryoutubeinstagrampinterestgoogle-plus

What One Item Do You Most Use for Cache Maintenance?Hey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Facebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: What one item do you most use for cache maintenance?

After reading through all the answers, we found that new log books or log paper tops the list handily. Next runner up is plastic or poly bags to keep those logs dry.

So here is what we heard:

  • Ron on Twitter shared: Seems like log sheets would top my list, and poly bags. Lots of wet logs not in bags
  • Kelly on FB shared: The one item that I have had to use for cache maintenance is a new log, than followed by a whole new container.
  • Jeff-N-Cheryl shared: Most of the time the first thing I grab is a paper towel. Doesn't pay to replace the log if it's still wet inside the container.
  • Cleve shared: Camo duct tape.
  • There you have it folks; in addition to your pen or pencil, you should try to always carry replacement logs and baggies while out caching!

As always, we really enjoyed hearing about cache maintenance, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

1

"Water is the driving force of all nature"  -Leonardo da Vinci

Ask any Platypus. They’ll tell you that staying hydrated can mean the difference between an average day and an unforgettable day. That’s why we included the original collapsible, taste- and BPA-free hydration system in your April Cache Crate—for people living life to its fullest.

Nothing’s cleaner, greener*, or more versatile than a Platypus SoftBottle flexible bottle. Whether you’re out geocaching, working, running, catching a flight, or hitting the gym after work, the SoftBottle flexible bottle is your source for easy hydration.

Your body depends on water to survive. Every cell, tissue, and organ in your body needs water to work correctly. For example, your body uses water to maintain its temperature, remove waste, and lubricate joints. Water is needed for good health.

Symptoms of dehydration include the following:

  • Little or no urine, or urine that is darker than usual
  • Dry mouth
  • Sleepiness or fatigue
  • Extreme thirst
  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness or lightheaded feeling
  • No tears when crying

Don’t wait until you notice symptoms of dehydration to take action. Actively prevent dehydration by drinking plenty of water.

Tips for staying hydrated

  • Keep a bottle of water with you during the day. Purchasing bottled water is expensive and creates plastic bottle waste. Carry a reusable water bottle and fill it from the tap instead.
  • If you don’t like the taste of plain water, try adding a slice of lemon or lime to your drink.
  • Be sure to drink water before, during, and after a workout.
  • When you’re feeling hungry, drink water. Thirst is often confused with hunger. True hunger will not be satisfied by drinking water. Drinking water may also contribute to a healthy weight-loss plan. Some research suggests that drinking water can help you feel full.
  • If you have trouble remembering to drink water, drink on a schedule. For example, drink water when you wake up; at breakfast, lunch, and dinner; and when you go to bed. Or drink a small glass of water at the beginning of each hour.
  • Drink water when you go to a restaurant. It will keep you hydrated, and it’s free!

Partially adapted from: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/food-nutrition/nutrients/hydration-why-its-so-important.html

1

This month Cache Advance has joined up with the Geocaching Vlogger for the April #GeoChallenge!  This month's challenge is all about Geocaching Maintenance.  (Watch the video below for more details if you haven't already)  We thought we would offer you some helpful maintenance tips to help you with the #GeoChallenge of the Month.

No one likes to DNF a cache, or find only moldy mush in a broken cache container! Things can happen to any cache out in the wild: damaged container, moisture problems, full logs or they just go missing, aka getting “muggled”!  Here are some maintenance tips to keep those caches looking great!

Maintenance Tips for Geocaching Heros Image for Pinterest

For Geocache Cache Seekers – Be a Geocaching Hero with our Maintenance Tips:

The Geocacher’s Creed states “Make minor repairs if you can, it will save the owner a trip”. While you are our caching we recommend keeping a few supplies on hand to make repairs and do maintenance on the caches that you find, along with your own caches!  The very basics are replacement logs, baggies to keep the contents dry, and perhaps a spare pencil.

Maintenance Tips - Take Dr. B's Cache Repair Kit with you! Click Here to purchase.
Maintenance Tips: Take Dr. B's Cache Repair Kit with you!

Our Dr. B’s Cache Repair Kits are perfect for making many field repairs while you are on the go. You can add more items to it, such as swag, as well. When you do any maintenance on a cache that doesn’t belong to you, be sure to let the owner know so you do save them a trip, and that they can also remove the “Needs Maintenance” icon from their cache listing.

If the entire cache is ‘missing’, we do not recommend that you replace it without the owner’s permission. Perhaps you really DNFed a perfectly good cache that is just hidden well. Or perhaps the owner intends to archive the cache instead, and now they’ll have to go and retrieve  the throwdown that you left.

You are a geocaching hero when you do maintenance on any cache – the next cacher finder will thank you, and we all win!

Maintenance Tips For Geocache Owners:

The cache owner will assume all responsibility of their cache listings. Yes that is right; once you have placed a geocache it is your responsibility to maintain it, both physically and online too!

You should make occasional visits to your cache to ensure it is in proper working order, especially when someone reports a problem with the cache (missing, damaged, wet, etc.), or posts a Needs Maintenance log. Temporarily disable your cache to let others know not to search for it until you have addressed the problem. You are permitted a reasonable amount of time – generally up to 4 weeks – in which to check on your cache. If a cache is not being maintained, or has been temporarily disabled for an unreasonable length of time, it may be archived a reviewer.

These are your options if you receive a notification that your cache needs some attention:

  • Maintenance: Visit your geocache, make any needed repairs, and post an “Owner Maintenance” log so the community knows it’s available to find. If your cache was fine, please indicate so with the "Owner Maintenance" as well. The "Owner Maintenance" log cancels out any existing "Needs Maintenance" attributes on the cache page.
  • Disable: If you cannot check on your geocache within a reasonable amount of time, please disable your geocache listing. Once you perform maintenance, you can enable it and post an “Owner Maintenance” log.
  • Archive: If you decide it is time for your geocache to be permanently retired, please archive the listing and retrieve all physical stages. It is sad to see a cache go, but sometimes either a hide just becomes too ‘high maintenance’ or it has outlived its time since most cachers in the community have already found it. Perhaps opening up the territory will help another cacher to hide a new cache nearby.

To log any of these actions, visit your geocache page listing and select "Log your visit." The options to post Owner Maintenance, Temporarily Disable or Archive are all options from the next page.

The "Needs Maintenance" icon will show on your geocache listing if it has been reported by the community as needing maintenance. Geocachers see this icon as a sign that your geocache may not be in good condition and they may skip trying to find it.

Once you have made repairs, post an "Owner Maintenance" log on your geocache page. This log removes the Needs Maintenance icon.

Maintenance Tips for Geocache Repair - Image of Post a New Log on Geocaching.com

Additional reminders for geocache owners:

  • Replace the container if the current one is in bad condition
  • Make sure that that your container is watertight
  • If any of the contents are wet, dry them off or replace them
  • Check that there is enough space left in your logbook
  • If your geocache is not accessible due to weather or another issue, note this on the geocache page
  • Mark Trackables as "missing" if they are listed in the inventory but no longer are in the cache

The responsibility of your listing includes quality control of posts to the cache page too. We recommend that you delete any logs that appear to be bogus, counterfeit, off topic, or otherwise inappropriate.

Have fun out there while you are caching, and if we all pitch in a little on everyone’s caches, we all win!

Do you have any additional cache maintenance tips that you could share with us?  Please do so in the comments!

With winter well under way here in the Northern Hemisphere, we’d like to share some cold weather geocaching tips with you.

Cold Weather Geocaching Tips!

Safety and What to Pack:

The first thing to think about is safety and what to pack. Before heading out, here’s a quick checklist:

  • Be sure to tell someone where you are going: you can leave a note at home, email a friend, update your Facebook or Twitter with your intended caching target or area.
  • Pack extra batteries as the cold will drain the ones you have even faster.
  • Always carry water and food with you. That ’short hike’ (or drive) to the cache may turn out to be a lot longer than you planned. We often don’t drink enough fluids when out in the cold.
  • Don’t forget extra water for your kids & canine caching companions.
  • Check the forecast and watch the weather -it can change fast when you are geocaching! We like Wunderground.
  • Know when the sun will set -it gets dark early in the northern latitudes.
  • Pack a headlamp or flashlight. Better yet, pack two. And check the batteries.

winter-night-caching-group

Finding Caches in Cold Weather:

OK, so you’re all set: gear is packed, GPS is fired up and you’re at the trail head … Now, off to finding caches!

  • Mark your car’s coordinates.
  • Know your limits, and those of your caching companions. That 10 minute hike can take over an hour in some winter conditions. It’s OK to DNF a cache and make it home alright.
  • Do your best to ensure that all seals on the cache are tight and closed properly to avoid moisture from getting in.
  • Be careful not to damage frozen containers as you may find some caches frozen shut. Don’t ruin the cache by hitting it against something hard in an attempt to open it. You could break the seal and ruin the fun for everyone.
  • Don’t bring anything liquid to trade -it can freeze, burst and ruin the cache contents.

winter-hike-with-Eve

Cold Weather Cache Hiding Tips:

So you want to hide a cache in winter? Here are some tips.

  • Keep in mind the changing of the seasons. That snowy white camo might look great in winter, but stick out in the spring and summer.
  • Will the leaves turn and fall later, exposing your cache? Or grow back and mess up your camo?
  • Don’t leave anything liquid in the cache.
  • Use a water tight container.
  • Be sure to leave pencils, not pens, in the cache.
  • How will deep snow affect finding your cache? You might want to hide it above the expected snow level.
  • Use appropriate attributes for your cache. You may even need to change these with the changing of the seasons.

This is by no means an exhaustive list for cold weather caching. What tips do you have to add?

GQotDPinterestHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers onFacebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: Do you carry a first aid kit while geocaching?

After tallying all the answers, we found that 18% of cachers do not carry a first aid kit, and the other 82% either carry one or have one nearby while out caching.

So here is what we heard:

  • Stacywilson00 on Twitter shared: No, but I will be soon for our local 4-H club, it will be a year long project!
  • Fishgirl27 shared: Only when we don't end up needing it. Get injured more going after P&Gs
  • Kari on G+ shared: No, don't think it would be necessary unless I was in deep wilderness. Not much of that where I live.
  • Ry_Too_D2 shared: I cache with two kids. A first-aid kit is a necessity!
  • Chad on FB summed it up for most of us. He shared: It depends. A deep hike in the woods w/ my Geo-backpack is a yes. Short hikes no. Urban caching, I've got a first aid kit in the car.
  • And Scott shared: No. But now you've got me to thinking that I should.
    • Good to hear Scott, and stay safe!

As always we really enjoyed hearing about first aid kits, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

Florida was our family vacation trip: something called Disney World & Universal Studios (geocaches) was taking us from Washington state across the country for a week of warmth, a refuge from Spokane's winter grip. Geocachers usually have ulterior motives on such trips, adding as many geocaching finds in as many places as they can possibly fit in while still enjoying Mickey Mouse.

First priority was selecting how to get there, 2,807 miles, 38 hours driving without traffic, 172 hours driving while finding geocaches, I was out voted ... we're flying. While checking flights online, one must consider many important factors; cost, departure, arrival time and layovers which may facilitate the finding of geocaches near the airport. We had 2 layovers. Unfortunately they was only one hour each at Salt Lake City and Cincinnati, which had a nearby virtual cache (GCB6FD). I could only hope for a delayed flight if I wanted to pick up any of these states as finds.

The weeks that led up to the trip were filled comparing prices at the parks, where to stay and of course what caches to find. I knew a visit to the only other brick and mortar geocaching store in the nation was a given, Space Coast Geocaching  on Merritt Island, Fl near the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

As the departure date neared, there were many evenings of repeated "pocket query" searches & making "Geocaching Lists" - favorite points, olds, virts, & earth caches. As I copied and printed all the requirements for the virtual geocaches so they would be easily accessible on a few sheets of paper, it brought back the memories of geocaching with my old Garmin HCX. Ahh ... the paper days of geocaching, no description or hints in the GPS.

I had my plan laid out well. The night before departure I'd run final "Pocket queries" and set up future "Pocket queries" to run automatically thru the trip so I would simply access Geocaching.com and load them via my laptop while in Florida. My plan was perfect until a storm packing near hurricane-force winds slammed into the Inland Northwest knocking out trees and power to over 200,000 customers including us. The PQ's would have to wait until we arrived in Florida.

As we left the storm ravaged area we arrived at our first layover. No delays, but I got a window seat and took some pictures of caches that lay below outside of Salt Lake City, Maple Mountain High, (GC8106) a 1x4 2002, 12-hour hiking cache, soon after came Denver and a super view of the site for upcoming GeoWoodstock 14er - 2016 (GC5Q1ET). I was looking forward to attending this event & hadn't even completed this trip yet. Cincinnati offered no cache finding...where's a delay when you need one? I need Ohio on my geo map!

We arrived safely in Orlando and I deployed my first weapon, a Garmin Nuvi I brought from home. No extra fees from the car rental company and I did manage to previously load it with geocaches, a great tool in a new area which shows the roads and the best way to get there. My Nuvi version showed where the toll roads were so that was a bonus in this area.

Once morning came we were off to the Disney Parks. These are not only some of the best theme parks on earth but each themed world has a virtual geocache (EPCOT has 2 virtuals!) These are probably the most expensive caches I've ever found (but well worth it) as you must buy a ticket to enter, with the exception of one at a Disney resort. The Magic Kingdom cache (GC10FB) is the oldest in these parks, July 2001 with over 900 favorite points, it's the most favorite pointed cache in Florida. The other virtuals are from 2002 so it was nice to add numbers to my Jasmer challenge.

Untitled designThe next day it was more parks then I got the golden ticket, I got a free day to geocache on my own! I dropped the kids at Disney and headed to Crockett's Wilderness Adventure (GCA402), a 2002 virt that included several waypoints. I got thru security at the main gate then found WP1, however the trails were closed for remodel for the next WP. I wasn't giving up and continued searching the grounds for another way to WP2, eventually finding another trail and set off with a successful find but I had paid dearly in time finding an alternate way.

Untitled design (1)

 

 

 

I headed south & found a few traditional caches, including a 4.5 x 1.5 cache, Evil - Tribute to the Master of Stress (GC54MDA) - it has over 50 finds and nearly as many DNF's. Once I found GZ, I began the search, palm trees & some tropical bush bigger than a fir tree, I widened my search and got lucky by just a glimpse of something out of place, a cool 5 minutes had passed by from start to finish. I can usually find a nano in the woods but not a small or regular geocache! I headed north as I hadn't planned on the many freeways causing such havoc on getting from location to location in this area.

I was in a newer area of Orlando and most the caches were just outside gated communities. I'd park the car just out the gate and make a made dash to the cache.  I found one ammo can and that was cool.

Florida caches are surely different than the Pacific Northwest, its flatter than a pancake, there's sand, big plants and many strange bugs, I got tangled in several spider webs just waiting for a geocacher meal. I jumped around and swatted virtual creatures off me several times. Then there's the possibility of an alligator...I kind of wanted to see one and kind of didn't want to meet up with one.

After a long series of DNF's I headed east on another toll road. The closest thing to toll roads at home is a bridge 280 miles away in Seattle. I brought plenty of spare change with me and got pretty good at tossing my change into the cache (cash) tube.

I arrived at an old Orlando cemetery "Home of Very Distinguished Roots" cache GCGGT a 2003 virt. The warm Florida rain soon drizzled, then poured down to help me with my finds. There we're several other caches nearby and then another nearby 2003 virt and a few traditionals. The sun was setting and I needed to get back and call it a day.

We continued with Universal Studios where I logged another virt "Divided we fall" GC73A6, a section of the Berlin Wall, very historic and the 2nd piece of wall I've found, both having a geocache. The first was near Hope, Idaho "Fieldtrip of History" GCGRCF.

Another cache type I did pocket queries for was event caches. There were three nearby events three days before we arrived & a day after we left! It would have been fun to meet up with other cachers from around the world.  I had also brought along my magnetic travel bug & stuck it to the back of our rental car hoping another geocacher would discover us along a busy road or parking lot. None discovered us but it was still fun to display.

Soon we were heading east to the Atlantic Ocean via Hwy 528 & a series of coin tossing cache toll booths - it was almost like doing a multi cache!

Space Coast was the first stop. It was awesome seeing another geocaching store and Dale & Barbs was similar to the Cache Advance store. They had quite a collection of geo goods and hospitality to boot! After looking at everything on the shelves & walls I even found a bottle of Cache Advance wine which I suggested we pop open! It was time to discover the many trackables they had to share with visiting geocachers. There was even a collection of Pathtags on a refrigerator door that had tags from cachers back home; Kidvegas19, Chumpo, Mtngoat50 & others.
I had brought some trackables from home to exchange too. I had already taken a few of the trackables into the Disney Parks and included them in part of the trip taking photos of them (minus the TB numbers) then posted them on the trackables log page.

Untitled design (2)

I highly recommend anyone going to Florida to make sure they stop by and check out the big ammo can geocache and Dale & Barbs store which has the 2nd highest favorite points in Florida.

The warm waters of the Atlantic was our next quest & we got prime directions to a public beach complete with an earthcache "Molly Says Sand, do you dig it?" GC32Z0C. After some excavation in the sand and fulfilling the requirements I deployed my two meter parafoil stunt kite & buzzed the sky while standing in the warm ocean, pretty cool.

Untitled design (3)

Cocoa Beach provided souvenir shops then we had "Chinese picnic" at a restaurant that specialized in take-out. The food was good, well-priced and we were starving! Chinese food with paper plates and plastic silverware, it was classic!

The last days we finished up the theme parks, the virtual caches. Then up early for a morning flight taking us to Minneapolis, Minnesota another one hour layover, there was a nearby virt "Falcon" GCJAHG, however the cache was disabled as the museum was closed for the season. There were a few other close traditional geocaches however a person can't get a delayed flight when they want one! We spent the extra time on the tarmac being de-iced for the return to Spokane.

Flying across the northern states crossing cache after cache, I'd been down there via Amtrak a few years ago and cached my way to Chicago, Los Angeles and back to Spokane. Altitude decreasing, I was recognizing these mountains in Idaho - hey I'd been on the top of that one, "4x4 series, Top of the World" GC5AVX3 & gotten FTF with BruhnWa, & there was the St. Joe River and Lake Coeur d'Alene. Gear lowering, flaps down, tires screeching, were back to snowy Spokane.

It was a great trip, I found 19 caches; 9 virtuals, 1 earthcache & a handful of DNF's.

Traveling is a great way to see the hidden unique places, away from the theme parks and the crowds.

If you geocache, prepare with "Pocket query searches", make geocaching "Lists," find the types and difficulty terrain caches you enjoy, and be familiar with how your GPS or phone operates while caching, and you will have a great trip too!

scareway

GQotDPinterestHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers onFacebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: How many geocaching events have you attended?

After tallying all the answers, we found that cachers have attended 63.5 events on average. I’ve found that once a newer cacher attends their first event, they are usually hooked and go to as many as they can. And we can be a pretty social bunch!

So here is what we heard:

  • Adam on FB shared: As of today I have attended 2 Megas, 40 Events, and 10 CITOs. I go to events as often as I possibly can! It's always a great excuse to meet up with my friends who seem to primarily be cachers these days
  • Maryann really hit the ground running. She shared: we have attended 15 in the 6 months that we have be caching.
  • Peter shared: 151. But we don't log our own events, as some do. So it might be more...
    • Today we asked about logging your own events –very interesting reading!!
  • So for those wondering, I have 271 events logged, but as usual I’m a little behind in my logging so it should be a tad higher. Yes, as a professional cacher, it is my job to attend events. What can I say?

As always we really enjoyed hearing about geocaching events, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

GeocacheHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: Are there certain geocache attributes that you avoid when seeking?

After tallying all the answers, we found that about a third of you don’t avoid any particular cache attributes. The main attributes that most cachers avoid are: Needs Maintenance, Front Yard Caches, Tree climbing, Boat and Scuba required.

So here is what we heard:

  • Jo on G+ shared: Not overall, but sometimes we'll exclude certain attributes during a specific trip.
  • James on FB shared: .. I go for every cache I can get my hands on
  • Kim shared: I'll at least take a stab at all of em.
  • Jerry shared: Nope. (But if the last log says the unforgivable "I hid it better", I pass.)
    • Probably wise Jerry!
  • Barbara shared: I don't go if it says I need a boat. Also think twice about a cache on someone's front yard.
  • Lori shared: Disabilities cause me to look in advance. Wish some cachers would use them. Its so disappointing to get to a cache and see that there is no way I can get to it . Side note: if you claim a t-1 it better be handicapped accessible, more times than not I can't get it.
  • Gene shared: I gave up tree climbing for Lent many years ago and I only go after water caches if somebody has a canoe and wants me to go with them.

As always we really enjoyed hearing about cache attributes, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Watch the Periscope Recording:

Thanks, and Happy Caching!