GQotD-RecapHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ a question about geocaching.  This weekend, we went back to replay some of our older questions and found one about challenge caches.

We recently asked: Have you completed any challenge caches yet?

  • After tallying all the answers, we found that everyone who replied has completed at least one challenge cache.
  • So here’s what we heard:
    • Louis’s comment on G+ was a shared by many. He says: Several.  And there are several more on my "Grab it when I'm in the area" list.
    • James on FB had a different opinion: I've done quite a few over the years but my attitude toward them has changed over time. Back when they were few and far between, I took on most of them. But now that you can't hardly swing an ammocan without hitting one, my usual response to a new one being published is "meh". I'll do them if I've already qualified (making them essentially just a traditional cache) but otherwise, my interests are elsewhere and I don't usually bother with them.
    • Kevin on FB shared: Yes, I like the variety of caching they can encompass. I'm actually working on a meta-challenge (100 challenge caches found)
    • Don shared: Yes, plenty. They add a lot more interest to geocaching than just doing individual caches!

As always we really enjoyed hearing about challenge caches, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

GQotD-RecapHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ a question about geocaching.  This weekend, we went back to replay some of our older questions and found one about puzzle/unknown caches.

We recently asked: How many puzzle/unknown caches have you found, and what is this % of your total finds?

 

  • After tallying all the answers, we found the average for puzzle caches is 9.7% of cacher’s total finds.
  • So here’s what we heard:
    • Chad on FB shared: 229 (12.7%) - that will spike to over 300 between now and Pi Day as we're doing a couple puzzle series runs.
    • The Boxman Crew shared: 1288 puzzles found, 21.52% they are some of our favorites.
    • Terry on G+ is new to geocaching and shared: 0%  hoping to find my first one on Pi Day.  I've only found 21 caches so far.
    • Callahanmatt on T shared: 64 or 2.62% but hopefully more now I have the 'How to Puzzle Cache' book!
      • I hear that is a great book!
    • For those wondering, I have found 429 puzzle caches, for (5.58%) of my total. I’m a bit behind in logging but this shouldn’t change too much. Time for me to get my thinking cap back on!!

As always we really enjoyed hearing about puzzle caches, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

GQotDPinterestHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Now you can hear the most recent recap on the Podcacher Podcast with the Geocaching Question of the Day weekly!  Tune in Sunday night for this week's question recap.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ a question about geocaching.  This week we go back in time to replay some of our older questions and found this one about GPS units.  

Last year we asked: What GPS unit (or phone...) did you use to find your first geocache?

 

  • After tallying all the answers, we found that the majority of cachers, or 62%, found their first cache with a handheld GPS. But, nearly 1 in 5, or 19%, used a Smartphone. Maps, compass and hints only came in at 12%.
  • So here’s what we heard:
    • Terry on G+ shared: First geocache was found on a windows mobile back in 2008.
    • Jerry on FB was an accidental geocacher. He shares: the 'first first' was an accidental find, so none. The first after I registered? hahahaha a Tom-Tom!
    • Lee on FB shared: The first cache I found was by the description only. I did not have a GPS yet.
      • I’ve cached with Lee many times and this doesn’t surprise me at all! He’s a natural.
    • TSMola01 shared: Garmin Etrex Legend with no base maps. Smartphones weren't even a thing yet, let alone a caching option when I started.
    • Like TSMola01, I found my first cache with a Garmin eTrex Venture with NO maps. I used that for my first 500 finds. Upgrading to color maps was like a whole new world! Pretty amazing how far the tech has come.

As always we really enjoyed hearing about geocaching, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Got a NEW answer to add after all this time?  Please do in the comments, we'd love to hear it!

Do you prefer to hide or find geocaches?Hey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.  This week we're running a "Flashback Friday" recap on the Geocaching Question of the Day.  We'll be back to normal next week.  

Now you can hear the recap on the Podcacher Podcast with the Geocaching Question of the Day weekly!  Tune in Sunday night for this week's question recap.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Facebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: Do you prefer to hide or find geocaches?

  • After tallying all the answers, we found that the majority of cachers, 70% prefer to find, while 18% prefer to hide, and about 1 in 10 enjoy both equally.
  • So here’s what we heard:
    • Doug on G+ Shared: Find. I find there's a lot of pressure in hiding, and the saturation of the area means that the only place open for new hiders (since I've hidden none) are LPCs, and who needs more of those?
    • Jennifer on FB spoke for many when she said: Find. I've had too many issues with my hides so now my only "hides" are events I host. –Speaking of events:
    • Stale on FB shared: I love to hide and arrange events. My geocache #900 is in the reviewers queue right now.
    • Andy on G+ shared: I do a lot more finding - because hiding a good cache can be a lot of work.  But I think hiding is much more rewarding, when you see a list of positive comments in the cache logs.
    • Joan shared: The find- especially after a DNF was just logged on that cache!

As always we really enjoyed hearing about hiding and finding geocaches, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

Don't forget! Tune in for the #GQotD every week on the Podcacher Podcast!

 

What One Item Do You Most Use for Cache Maintenance?Hey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Facebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: What one item do you most use for cache maintenance?

After reading through all the answers, we found that new log books or log paper tops the list handily. Next runner up is plastic or poly bags to keep those logs dry.

So here is what we heard:

  • Ron on Twitter shared: Seems like log sheets would top my list, and poly bags. Lots of wet logs not in bags
  • Kelly on FB shared: The one item that I have had to use for cache maintenance is a new log, than followed by a whole new container.
  • Jeff-N-Cheryl shared: Most of the time the first thing I grab is a paper towel. Doesn't pay to replace the log if it's still wet inside the container.
  • Cleve shared: Camo duct tape.
  • There you have it folks; in addition to your pen or pencil, you should try to always carry replacement logs and baggies while out caching!

As always, we really enjoyed hearing about cache maintenance, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

GQotDPinterestHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Facebook, Twitter and Google+  a question about geocaching.

We recently asked: What is your find rate of geocaches per day?

After tallying all the answers, we found that on average, cachers find 2.75 caches per day.

So here is what we heard:

  • Jim on FB shared: Sadly, now in my 8th year of caching, my find rate has dropped to a meager 4.4226 caches/day. I really liked it when I was up in the 6's /day but life gets in the way.
  • Josh shared: 1.5 per day. Just crossed our second year caching. Good start Josh!!
  • Matthew shared: It's currently Pi. 3.1436/day
    • wow that is very cool, as Pi Day is right around the corner!
  • My find rate is only 1.6 currently. That seems way down, but I have missed quite a few Cache Machines in the past 2 years. This will start to change as we’re headed to the Tri Cities Cache Machine next weekend, and we should pick up well over 100 caches on the trip!

As always, we really enjoyed hearing about find rates, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Thanks, and Happy Caching!

January 2016 Cache Crates were sent weeks ago and we're pleased to give you a peek inside the box!

In case you didn't know, a Cache Crates is a fun box of geocaching and outdoor gear delivered to your door!  Sign up for your Cache Crate by clicking here!

A Look Inside

 

USB Mini Light

mini-lightThe UrbanGear Collection includes multipurpose and durable items that make everyday life easier.

You can easily attach this MiniLight to your backpack so that when you need a little more light, you already have it with you. UrbanGear is engineered to prepare you for any situation.

• Bright 10 lumen LED light
• Lasts up to 120 minutes with continuous use
• Full charge in 2-3 hours via USB port
• Keychain clip attachment
• Comes with water-resistant case

GEOCACHING GPS: GREAT PERSONAL STORIES (love stories, in time to read by Valentine's Day)

51bu_z1bqglThis book is the first-ever anthology of heart-warming stories dedicated to geocaching. Inside, you’re invited to enjoy 43 geocaching stories from 4 different continents and experience:

Stories of Romance… You’ll discover six stories that show just how creative geocachers can be when it comes to meeting the love of their life, proposing to that person, and honoring the love over the years.

Stories of Adventure… From the dangers of searching for geocaches near cliffs or lakes, to hunting for a cache in prison, these 28 stories are sure to have you feeling the adrenaline right along with the cacher.

Stories of Connection… Geocaching is so much more than just finding the cache – it’s also about forging life-long friendships, bonding over a shared love of the outdoors, and meeting new people.

Geowoodstock Blue Hippy Van Cachekinz**

van

**The Cachekinz have all been activated, and are ready to be adopted out.

The GeoWoodstock HippyVan Race:
http://www.tb-run.com/show-race-CRATE2GWS14ER.html

Race details here:
http://www.cache-advance.com/blog/cache-crate-travel-bug-race/

Trackable Addon: Dasher Dragonfly Geocoin

dragonfly_dasher-1

Watch the video:

Click here to Subscribe to the Cache Crate!  

With winter well under way here in the Northern Hemisphere, we’d like to share some cold weather geocaching tips with you.

Cold Weather Geocaching Tips!

Safety and What to Pack:

The first thing to think about is safety and what to pack. Before heading out, here’s a quick checklist:

  • Be sure to tell someone where you are going: you can leave a note at home, email a friend, update your Facebook or Twitter with your intended caching target or area.
  • Pack extra batteries as the cold will drain the ones you have even faster.
  • Always carry water and food with you. That ’short hike’ (or drive) to the cache may turn out to be a lot longer than you planned. We often don’t drink enough fluids when out in the cold.
  • Don’t forget extra water for your kids & canine caching companions.
  • Check the forecast and watch the weather -it can change fast when you are geocaching! We like Wunderground.
  • Know when the sun will set -it gets dark early in the northern latitudes.
  • Pack a headlamp or flashlight. Better yet, pack two. And check the batteries.

winter-night-caching-group

Finding Caches in Cold Weather:

OK, so you’re all set: gear is packed, GPS is fired up and you’re at the trail head … Now, off to finding caches!

  • Mark your car’s coordinates.
  • Know your limits, and those of your caching companions. That 10 minute hike can take over an hour in some winter conditions. It’s OK to DNF a cache and make it home alright.
  • Do your best to ensure that all seals on the cache are tight and closed properly to avoid moisture from getting in.
  • Be careful not to damage frozen containers as you may find some caches frozen shut. Don’t ruin the cache by hitting it against something hard in an attempt to open it. You could break the seal and ruin the fun for everyone.
  • Don’t bring anything liquid to trade -it can freeze, burst and ruin the cache contents.

winter-hike-with-Eve

Cold Weather Cache Hiding Tips:

So you want to hide a cache in winter? Here are some tips.

  • Keep in mind the changing of the seasons. That snowy white camo might look great in winter, but stick out in the spring and summer.
  • Will the leaves turn and fall later, exposing your cache? Or grow back and mess up your camo?
  • Don’t leave anything liquid in the cache.
  • Use a water tight container.
  • Be sure to leave pencils, not pens, in the cache.
  • How will deep snow affect finding your cache? You might want to hide it above the expected snow level.
  • Use appropriate attributes for your cache. You may even need to change these with the changing of the seasons.

This is by no means an exhaustive list for cold weather caching. What tips do you have to add?

Florida was our family vacation trip: something called Disney World & Universal Studios (geocaches) was taking us from Washington state across the country for a week of warmth, a refuge from Spokane's winter grip. Geocachers usually have ulterior motives on such trips, adding as many geocaching finds in as many places as they can possibly fit in while still enjoying Mickey Mouse.

First priority was selecting how to get there, 2,807 miles, 38 hours driving without traffic, 172 hours driving while finding geocaches, I was out voted ... we're flying. While checking flights online, one must consider many important factors; cost, departure, arrival time and layovers which may facilitate the finding of geocaches near the airport. We had 2 layovers. Unfortunately they was only one hour each at Salt Lake City and Cincinnati, which had a nearby virtual cache (GCB6FD). I could only hope for a delayed flight if I wanted to pick up any of these states as finds.

The weeks that led up to the trip were filled comparing prices at the parks, where to stay and of course what caches to find. I knew a visit to the only other brick and mortar geocaching store in the nation was a given, Space Coast Geocaching  on Merritt Island, Fl near the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

As the departure date neared, there were many evenings of repeated "pocket query" searches & making "Geocaching Lists" - favorite points, olds, virts, & earth caches. As I copied and printed all the requirements for the virtual geocaches so they would be easily accessible on a few sheets of paper, it brought back the memories of geocaching with my old Garmin HCX. Ahh ... the paper days of geocaching, no description or hints in the GPS.

I had my plan laid out well. The night before departure I'd run final "Pocket queries" and set up future "Pocket queries" to run automatically thru the trip so I would simply access Geocaching.com and load them via my laptop while in Florida. My plan was perfect until a storm packing near hurricane-force winds slammed into the Inland Northwest knocking out trees and power to over 200,000 customers including us. The PQ's would have to wait until we arrived in Florida.

As we left the storm ravaged area we arrived at our first layover. No delays, but I got a window seat and took some pictures of caches that lay below outside of Salt Lake City, Maple Mountain High, (GC8106) a 1x4 2002, 12-hour hiking cache, soon after came Denver and a super view of the site for upcoming GeoWoodstock 14er - 2016 (GC5Q1ET). I was looking forward to attending this event & hadn't even completed this trip yet. Cincinnati offered no cache finding...where's a delay when you need one? I need Ohio on my geo map!

We arrived safely in Orlando and I deployed my first weapon, a Garmin Nuvi I brought from home. No extra fees from the car rental company and I did manage to previously load it with geocaches, a great tool in a new area which shows the roads and the best way to get there. My Nuvi version showed where the toll roads were so that was a bonus in this area.

Once morning came we were off to the Disney Parks. These are not only some of the best theme parks on earth but each themed world has a virtual geocache (EPCOT has 2 virtuals!) These are probably the most expensive caches I've ever found (but well worth it) as you must buy a ticket to enter, with the exception of one at a Disney resort. The Magic Kingdom cache (GC10FB) is the oldest in these parks, July 2001 with over 900 favorite points, it's the most favorite pointed cache in Florida. The other virtuals are from 2002 so it was nice to add numbers to my Jasmer challenge.

Untitled designThe next day it was more parks then I got the golden ticket, I got a free day to geocache on my own! I dropped the kids at Disney and headed to Crockett's Wilderness Adventure (GCA402), a 2002 virt that included several waypoints. I got thru security at the main gate then found WP1, however the trails were closed for remodel for the next WP. I wasn't giving up and continued searching the grounds for another way to WP2, eventually finding another trail and set off with a successful find but I had paid dearly in time finding an alternate way.

Untitled design (1)

 

 

 

I headed south & found a few traditional caches, including a 4.5 x 1.5 cache, Evil - Tribute to the Master of Stress (GC54MDA) - it has over 50 finds and nearly as many DNF's. Once I found GZ, I began the search, palm trees & some tropical bush bigger than a fir tree, I widened my search and got lucky by just a glimpse of something out of place, a cool 5 minutes had passed by from start to finish. I can usually find a nano in the woods but not a small or regular geocache! I headed north as I hadn't planned on the many freeways causing such havoc on getting from location to location in this area.

I was in a newer area of Orlando and most the caches were just outside gated communities. I'd park the car just out the gate and make a made dash to the cache.  I found one ammo can and that was cool.

Florida caches are surely different than the Pacific Northwest, its flatter than a pancake, there's sand, big plants and many strange bugs, I got tangled in several spider webs just waiting for a geocacher meal. I jumped around and swatted virtual creatures off me several times. Then there's the possibility of an alligator...I kind of wanted to see one and kind of didn't want to meet up with one.

After a long series of DNF's I headed east on another toll road. The closest thing to toll roads at home is a bridge 280 miles away in Seattle. I brought plenty of spare change with me and got pretty good at tossing my change into the cache (cash) tube.

I arrived at an old Orlando cemetery "Home of Very Distinguished Roots" cache GCGGT a 2003 virt. The warm Florida rain soon drizzled, then poured down to help me with my finds. There we're several other caches nearby and then another nearby 2003 virt and a few traditionals. The sun was setting and I needed to get back and call it a day.

We continued with Universal Studios where I logged another virt "Divided we fall" GC73A6, a section of the Berlin Wall, very historic and the 2nd piece of wall I've found, both having a geocache. The first was near Hope, Idaho "Fieldtrip of History" GCGRCF.

Another cache type I did pocket queries for was event caches. There were three nearby events three days before we arrived & a day after we left! It would have been fun to meet up with other cachers from around the world.  I had also brought along my magnetic travel bug & stuck it to the back of our rental car hoping another geocacher would discover us along a busy road or parking lot. None discovered us but it was still fun to display.

Soon we were heading east to the Atlantic Ocean via Hwy 528 & a series of coin tossing cache toll booths - it was almost like doing a multi cache!

Space Coast was the first stop. It was awesome seeing another geocaching store and Dale & Barbs was similar to the Cache Advance store. They had quite a collection of geo goods and hospitality to boot! After looking at everything on the shelves & walls I even found a bottle of Cache Advance wine which I suggested we pop open! It was time to discover the many trackables they had to share with visiting geocachers. There was even a collection of Pathtags on a refrigerator door that had tags from cachers back home; Kidvegas19, Chumpo, Mtngoat50 & others.
I had brought some trackables from home to exchange too. I had already taken a few of the trackables into the Disney Parks and included them in part of the trip taking photos of them (minus the TB numbers) then posted them on the trackables log page.

Untitled design (2)

I highly recommend anyone going to Florida to make sure they stop by and check out the big ammo can geocache and Dale & Barbs store which has the 2nd highest favorite points in Florida.

The warm waters of the Atlantic was our next quest & we got prime directions to a public beach complete with an earthcache "Molly Says Sand, do you dig it?" GC32Z0C. After some excavation in the sand and fulfilling the requirements I deployed my two meter parafoil stunt kite & buzzed the sky while standing in the warm ocean, pretty cool.

Untitled design (3)

Cocoa Beach provided souvenir shops then we had "Chinese picnic" at a restaurant that specialized in take-out. The food was good, well-priced and we were starving! Chinese food with paper plates and plastic silverware, it was classic!

The last days we finished up the theme parks, the virtual caches. Then up early for a morning flight taking us to Minneapolis, Minnesota another one hour layover, there was a nearby virt "Falcon" GCJAHG, however the cache was disabled as the museum was closed for the season. There were a few other close traditional geocaches however a person can't get a delayed flight when they want one! We spent the extra time on the tarmac being de-iced for the return to Spokane.

Flying across the northern states crossing cache after cache, I'd been down there via Amtrak a few years ago and cached my way to Chicago, Los Angeles and back to Spokane. Altitude decreasing, I was recognizing these mountains in Idaho - hey I'd been on the top of that one, "4x4 series, Top of the World" GC5AVX3 & gotten FTF with BruhnWa, & there was the St. Joe River and Lake Coeur d'Alene. Gear lowering, flaps down, tires screeching, were back to snowy Spokane.

It was a great trip, I found 19 caches; 9 virtuals, 1 earthcache & a handful of DNF's.

Traveling is a great way to see the hidden unique places, away from the theme parks and the crowds.

If you geocache, prepare with "Pocket query searches", make geocaching "Lists," find the types and difficulty terrain caches you enjoy, and be familiar with how your GPS or phone operates while caching, and you will have a great trip too!

scareway

WatchlistsHey Cachers! This is Lookout Lisa from Cache Advance, and I’m your host for the Geocaching Question of the Day.  Today we're going to flashback to replay some of our older questions and found one about watchlists.

Cache Advance is your geocaching hub for all of your caching needs, including the Cache Crate, a monthly subscription box of geocaching and outdoor gear.

Monday through Thursdays, we ask our followers on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ a question about geocaching. 

Earlier this year we asked:  Do you use watchlists for geocaches or trackables?

  • After tallying all the answers, we found that most all cachers do use watchlists for both caches and trackables.
  • So here’s what we heard:
    • Laura on FB shared: yes I do. Mostly for caches that are on my list of wanting to do.
    • Kurt on FB shared: Both, its a great way to see where TB's/coins reappear after 'disapppearing."
    • Chris on FB was our only dissenter. He shared: No lists. If I find one, I like for it to be a total surprise.
    • Austin on G+ shared: I use watch lists for caches I can't find, that way I can later see if it was my fault or if other cachers can't find them either. So either an "argh!" or an "I knew it was missing!"
    • Dano on G+ shared: I watch every cache I DNF so that once people find it I know to go back and who to email for an extra hint.

As always we really enjoyed hearing about watchlists, and you can too, if you-

-Follow us, Cache Advance, on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ for the Geocaching Question of the Day.

Do you have an answer to add to this question of the day?  Feel free to do it in the comments below!